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Onsdag 5 juli 2017 kl. 17:00 – 19:00

Wisby Strands Veranda

Opticom, Adxto & Mimerex
arrangerar även i år ett gemensamt mingel för våra kunder.
Vi bjuder på rosé, tilltugg samt ett lättsamt samkväm med kollegor i branschen.
Vi kommer vid tillfället att informera om våra verksamheter.

Vi hoppas att du vill komma och ser fram emot att träffa dig!

Varmt välkommen önskar
Carl Michael Bergman, Helena Östregård, Pontus Torstensson och kollegor

Tyvärr har vi ett begränsat antal platser, så anmäl dig gärna så snart som möjligt: Anmälan
Om du får förhinder, meddela oss gärna via: almedalen@opticom.se

Vill du veta mer om vad vi på Opticom, Adxto och Mimerex arbetar med? Kontakta oss gärna eller besök våra hemsidor:

Carl Michael Bergman, VD, Opticom: carl.michael@opticom.se  Opticom Group Opticom International Research

Helena Östregård, VD, Adxto helena.ostregard@adxto.com Adxto

Pontus Torstensson, VD, Mimerex pontus.torstensson@mimerex.com Mimerex

 

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Francesco De Rosa, with vast experience from the international pharma industry at various prominent positions within sales, brand and business managing, gives the background to one of his first experiences with Opticom International Research: “At the time, I had taken over a very important Pfizer brand with a five-year legacy of declining market shares and I needed to get a 360 degree understanding of the decision-making process within the growth hormone therapy area” he explains and continues: “My scope was clear: bend the trend!”.

To gain this crucial understanding, Francesco turned to Opticom, a company which had previously delivered very good and useful results in projects for another pharmaceutical brand he had worked with. In the project of close co-operation that followed, Opticom conducted about 100 qualitative interviews with parents, paediatricians, and nurses to understand their different needs and reasoning within this therapy area.

The research discovered many “leaks” that delayed children’s access to treatment as well as large regional differences. Based on Opticom’s comprehensive analysis of the patient journey and treatment rationales, Francesco was able to change his company’s strategy, including a relocation of resources, better aligned to the customer landscape, as well as to improve communication around the value of treatment. In addition, the team could optimize its different support tools to physicians, nurses and parents, in order to facilitate earlier diagnose and better compliance.

Furthermore, Francesco and his colleagues came up with an improved treatment device to deal with an issue rated very important among respondents in the survey: Ease-of-use.

He describes the direct impact of this new, very valuable market knowledge: “Thanks to the new insights we designed a new device for the treatment of growth hormones deficiencies among children in order to meet the single most important factor in the choice of treatment: Easy-of-use of the device. This resulted in a patent available in more than 100 countries worldwide”.

As a result of the new strategy, the brand soon turned decline into growth and has been continuing this positive development ever since.

According to Francesco, the generation of updated customer insights is key to their business. Understanding both traditional and non-traditional stakeholders, their needs, as well as the patient journey and the decision-making process is fundamental in forming a successful business strategy.

In these situations you need a consulting company with a strong focus on quality, and with a thorough process for both research as well as analysis that delivers real and actionable results. That is where Opticom comes in as a very valuable partner with the staff’s vast knowledge and experience of the pharma industry:  “They are methodical in their understanding of customer needs and in making sure that the setup of the project, from the very start to result implementation, is consistent and with a great focus on details and delivery” says Francesco, who would definitely engage Opticom again to gain strategic insights and/or to facilitate optimized communication.

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Stockholm, Sweden, July 07, 2016 – Opticom International Research now presents the results of the 7th edition of the “Brand Equity Tracking Survey – Cartonboard: Brand owners”. This industry standard benchmark survey for cartonboard brands has been conducted among
351 consumer goods brand owners across 8 countries in Europe and active in one of the following 6 segments: Cosmetics & beauty care, Pharmaceuticals & healthcare, Chocolate & confectionery, Frozen & chilled food, Dry food, Wines & spirits. The countries covered are Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium and Switzerland.

The top European cartonboard brands according to the Opticom Brand Equity Index are:

Ranking 2016 (2014/2012*) Brand Owner of the brand
1 (3/2) Incada Iggesund
2 (1/3) Tambrite Stora Enso
3 (2/1) Invercote Iggesund
4 (7/11) Carta range Metsä Board
5 (5/7) Simcote Metsä Board
6 (11/10) CKB Stora Enso
7 (6/5) Alaska Plus International Paper
8 (8/8) Rochcoat/blanc/perle Careo
9 (-/4) BillerudKorsnäs BillerudKorsnäs
10 (9/9) Ensocoat Stora Enso
11 (4/6) Performa Stora Enso
12 (NEW) Algro Design Sappi
13 (NEW) Excellent Top MM Karton

* BEI 2012 based on recalculation including the 2012 data from Switzerland for comparison.

Both Iggesund and Stora Enso maintain their positions as owners of the most valuable brands since 2012. However, the competition is closing in with Carta range showing higher indices in both quality and loyalty than the leading brands and Simcote having a rather strong awareness index.

Compared to 2014, Algro Design (Sappi) and Excellent Top (MM Karton) have qualified for ranking for the first time; and BillerudKorsnäs (BillerudKorsnäs) is back in the ranking whereas Chromolux is exiting due to the lack of evaluations.

Main findings

The survey shows that the brand awareness levels are overall very low – similar to both 2014 and 2012 – and depending on the segment; brand owners active in Pharmaceutical & Healthcare show the highest level of awareness. On the other hand, prompted awareness levels are much higher and indicate a “passive” knowledge of the brands. The results show that the purchase/usage of a specific brand is no guarantee for its awareness among brand owners.

Cartonboard brands generally meet users’ expectations with the exception of value for money. In comparison with previous years, the gaps between the brand owners’ expectations and the brands’ performance are becoming more narrow overall, meaning the brands are better at meeting the brand owners’ expectations (with the exception in Value for money).

Overall brand owners are loyal to their current main brand and Carta range show the highest share of users (very) likely to continue using the brand.

Besides ranking the most valuable brands, the survey allowed us to look into what drives the choice and the purchase of a specific brand but also get insight into topics such as sustainability. Brand owners also shared interesting ideas on how to gain value from technical services and how producers could help them meet their most critical challenges.

 

About Opticom’s Brand Equity Index and the Cartonboard Tracking Survey

Opticom’s Brand Equity Index model assesses the impact of individual cartonboard brands, benchmarks the leading brands against each other and evaluates the success of individual brand strategies over time through four indexed key drivers of brand equity: spontaneous awareness, top-of-mind, qualities & associations and loyalty.

In order to improve the brand equity of their brands, brand owners should analyse the individual results for the different sub-indexes – both in comparison to the last survey as well as in relation to other brands – and determine where improvements can and need to be made. Do the brands get enough support in their marketing efforts? Do the cartonboard buyers understand that the things our brands are good at are important? Is the perception of the brand’s performance fair? Why have other brands with a similar positioning as ours been able to achieve more than our brand?

You can learn more by ordering the “Brand Equity Tracking Survey – Cartonboard 2016: Brand owners”. The survey is based on 351 interviews with brand owners active in six segments (Cosmetics & beauty care, Pharmaceuticals & healthcare, Chocolate & confectionery, Frozen & chilled food, Dry food, Wines & spirits) in 8 European countries (Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium and Switzerland). The survey has an overall purpose to identify and track: Brand Awareness, Brand Performance, Brand Loyalty and Brand Equity measured through Opticom’s Brand Equity Index (BEI). A second survey is available: “Brand Equity Tracking Survey – Cartonboard 2016: Converters” based on 225 interviews done in the same 8 countries with cartonboard converters.

In addition to issues directly related to brand equity, the 2016 edition of the survey also studies buying behaviour by looking at buying determinants and drivers for brand choice, sustainability issues, as well as how producers of cartonboard can help the brand owners and converters to meet their critical challenges.

For more information, or ordering of the survey, please contact Cécilia Vassal Nyholm at:

Phone: +46 (0)8 50 30 90 04 • Mobile: +46 (0)708 39 90 04 • E-mail: cecilia@opticom.se

Opticom International Research is a leading global market research and consulting firm with the mission to help our customers improve their results by transforming data and knowledge into strategic advice and concrete action plans. Since 1987, we have been dedicated to serving clients within the pulp, paper & board industry with customised research services focusing on commercial and marketing related issues. In combining our large global in-house research capabilities, state-of-the-art information technology and our pulp & paper competence we have proven to be a unique partner for a number of leading forest products companies all over the world that value not only speed and quality but also cost effectiveness in surveys and analyses.

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Cars for sale. Who cares?

Think of the word “chevalier”

At first hand, it implies that a man is chivalrous. A knight, as it was called way back in the day. Someone who was quite well off. Had a good hand with the ladies. A charmer.

But if you do your linguistic (i.e. French) research right, it is far simpler than that. It means a guy who owns a horse. No more, no less. A mere horse.

Owning a horse, in the old days, extended not only your body (taller, faster, tougher) but also your persona (smarter, sexier, more powerful).

Now fast forward to present days. Few men, and women, own a horse today. But very many of us own a car. And funnily enough, we have, for the last century, attributed that ownership the same connotations as our medieval predecessors did to their horses. We love and cherish the brand of the car we own and drive.

My car makes me not only taller, faster and tougher but also smarter, sexier and more powerful. At least, that is what we think. And what makes us spend a considerable part of our income on a rather dead piece of metal and plastic. At least compared to a horse.

But now things are changing.

Cars are not sold anymore. They are leased. Or even rented by the hour (without any shady implications). Basically, cars are owned by banks. Not by individuals.

So, from being an object that you own, cars have become a service that you buy. When you need it.

Where will this – in the longer perspective – lead to in terms of brand affinity and brand asset? Will young urban drivers develop a closer relationship with those brands that provide the functionality of a car-for-hire than the brands of those manufacturers that actually make cars-for-sale.

We don’t know yet. But we can find out.

Because we create value for companies around the world by transforming data and knowledge into strategic advice and efficient communication.

Car for sale. Who cares?

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Just before the turn of the millennium, in 1999, the consulting and research company Opticom carried out a survey of how senior representatives of what were at that time the major global pharmaceutical companies saw the future. How well does the companies’ vision coincide with the way things are now, 15 years later?

The report, Prescription for a healthy industry, also formed the basis for a series of articles in Svenska Dagbladet/Näringsliv written by Elisabeth Sandlund. The report was partly based on in-depth interviews with 34 senior executives at what were at that time the 20 largest pharmaceutical companies. Their analysis resulted in three main points:

  • There is still a large unsatisfied need for pharmaceuticals. There is no cure for two thirds of all illnesses. The world population is getting older. New research methods are being developed all the time and there will be substantial growth in DTC (direct-to-consumer sales).
  • Quick access to market is a key to success. In the face of tougher future competition, companies must launch new innovative products quickly.
  • Company mergers slow down companies’ development processes. The top executives questioned the benefits of mergers and wondered whether they were driven by the financial markets and by financial consultants. They were the main beneficiaries of mergers – not the patients.

The winners, predicted the author of the report, will be companies that succeed in achieving a high organic growth rate, companies that sell or outsource in areas outside their own core areas and companies that focus on a small number of therapeutic areas and companies that focus their efforts on their own stores and customers. Companies will benefit from alliances with other companies and research groups, in-licensing, greater investment in research and development and strategic use of information technology.

The losers, on the other hand, would be companies with weak research portfolios but that chose to merge – those companies lose their focus and their rhythm, and therefore their competitiveness…

Article continued in links below

Links to whole article:
Click here to read the full article (in English)Translated from original Swedish by Opticom.
Click here to read the full article (in Swedish).

 

 

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